Photography Links for Nov 14 2010

  • The Real Deal by Joe McNally on Joe McNally’s Blog

    Quote: What I truly believe about a powerful picture is that after viewing it, you are never the same. You have been changed, forever. You might not realize it at that moment, but you are. There’s been an interior, seismic shift in your emotional substrata. The plates tilted, just a little bit. These pictures linger, like a persistent thought. Or, like someone shouting to you in a rainstorm, it gets your attention, even if you can’t completely make out what it’s saying. Sometimes, they’re like a wound. Photographic scar tissue.

  • Capture A Moment – Before It Goes Away Forever by Scott Bourne on Photofocus

    Quote: Spend time shooting, not engaging in pedantic, petty arguments. Photography is a special gift. Photography is a time machine

  • Follow Your Vision by Ian Plant on Outdoor Photographer

    Quote: I just spent ten days photographing Zion National Park, and I saw something that has become increasingly common in the past few year—photographers wandering around with pages of photographs printed off the Internet. Presumably, they were on the hunt to recreate images they had seen taken by other photographers.

  • The Business of Photography: Establishing a Business Strategy by Robert J. Mang Digital Photography School

    Quote: Whether you consider yourself selling a service or a product, there are two fundamental sides to most small businesses, including photography businesses: the product/service side and the business/marketing side. Most of our energy goes into the product side (improving skills, learning about new equipment… just trying to get better at what we do). The business side is not studied as often; however, that is going to be the subject of this discussion. The focus of our attention will be on developing a sound business strategy.

  • How Will People Remember your Photography When You’re DEAD! By Brian Rueb on Pixiq

    Quote: How do you want to be remembered? When your photography career is finished and you’re too old to creak out of bed and walk the trail in search of new images, how will people to remember your work? How do you want them to remember your work?